Healing From Complex Trauma & PTSD/CPTSD

A journey to healing from complex trauma.


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Colouring is good for adults, and ‘Carl Jung recommended’ too for stress management :)

The following explains colouring is great for stress reduction and was confirmed by Carl Jung as a relaxation technique 🙂

So, it’s a win-win-win for me!

My inner child loves it, it is great for stress reduction and relaxation as an adult and good for PTSD stress management!

Fab!! 😀


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/13/coloring-for-stress_n_5975832.html?utm_hp_ref=arts&ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000030

Coloring is an activity that we tend to associate with children. As we grow older, we put aside our crayons and colored pencils in favor of more respectable writing utensils like pens and highlighters. However, it turns out coloring can be beneficial for adults — namely for its de-stressing power.

The practice generates wellness, quietness and also stimulates brain areas related to motor skills, the senses and creativity. In fact, publishers have lately been launching coloring books specifically for adults. The trend is alive and well in countries in Europe and North America. Most recently, in Spain, the publication Espasa published Coloréitor, with illustrations by well-known cartoonist Forges.

Does Coloring Really De-stress?

One of the first psychologists to apply coloring as a relaxation technique was Carl G. Jüng in the early 20th century. He did this through mandalas: circular designs with concentric shapes similar to the Gothic churches’ rose windows. They have their origin in India.

When coloring, we activate different areas of our two cerebral hemispheres, says psychologist Gloria Martínez Ayala. “The action involves both logic, by which we color forms, and creativity, when mixing and matching colors. This incorporates the areas of the cerebral cortex involved in vision and fine motor skills [coordination necessary to make small, precise movements]. The relaxation that it provides lowers the activity of the amygdala, a basic part of our brain involved in controlling emotion that is affected by stress.”

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